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Showing posts from July, 2014

Featured in Asheville's Mountain Express

This week's issue of the local alternative newspaper, the Mountain Express, features a cover story on tiny homes in Asheville. Writer Jake Frankel did his homework and talked to everyone in the area who has their hand in this movement. The result is a very well written and researched piece about the viability of tiny homes in the community.
There’s no easy answer, Guyton maintains, saying,“Market-based affordable housing is really a tough nut to crack.” Brown agrees. “Rent, as we all know, is insane in this town, and so is buying houses,” he says, adding that in the long term, he hopes Wishbone can be part of the solution. LaVoie, too, believes increased tiny home living could be an important component of a broader answer to the puzzle of how we can improve local quality of life economically, environmentally and culturally. “So it seems like a good idea to get the subject on the table and try to figure out ways we can make it viable within our community,” she says. “Ashe…

The Financial Impact of Tiny Homes

Months ago I spoke with a reporter named Nina. Truth be told, I forgot about that conversation until I received an email today. The article she was working on all this time was for Bloomberg.

What I love most about this article is that it focuses on the financial impact of tiny houses and leaves out the sensationalism so common with other outlets.

When Laura LaVoie began writing and blogging about the movement in 2010, “there were only one or two tiny house blogs and now there are hundreds,” she said. She quit her Atlanta-based job as a recruiter at a staffing company, sold her 2,700 square-foot house and pursued a career as a freelance writer by building a place with her husband in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina. “I felt really trapped,” she said. Moving to a 120 square-foot space enabled them “to live in a different way, take control of our lives.”
The article features a lot of other great voices in the Tiny House community, many of whom I have gotten to kn…